The Whitetail deer (white-tailed deer)

The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), known also as the whitetail deer, is a deer that is medium-sized indigenous in the United States, Central America, Mexico,, Canada, and as far south as Peru and Bolivia in South America. White-tailed (whitetail) deer have also journeyed to Hispaniola, Cuba, Puerto Rico, New Zealand, Jamaica, Lesser Antilles, Bahamas and some countries in Europe, such as the Finland, Czech Republic, and Serbia. In the United States, the whitetail deer is the most widely found wild animal.

In the USA, white-tailed deer are more generally found east of the Rockies, but in other parts, the black-tailed or mule deer are more typical. In the western parts of the United States, the whitetail deer is found mostly in deciduous river bottomlands and aspen parklands in and around the Great Plains , and in places of the northern Rocky Mountain areas through South Dakota and Wyoming. It is additionally found in northeastern British Columbia.

The area advancement into agribusiness around the northern Rockies and clear-cutting of a variety of coniferous trees resulting in a significantly greater amount of deciduous plants has aided whitetail deer and has pushed the population as far north as Bristish Columbia. White-tail deer have been located as far north as Fort St. John.. Whitetail deer around the Great Lakes have moved farther north, as land started being used a lot more for farming, which provided a wealth of deciduous vegetation. The species populace most to the west, labeled the Columbian whitetail deer, was once typical in the woods in and around the Willamette and Cowlitz River valleys in southwestern Washington and western Oregon, but now white-tailed deer numbers have been considerably reduced, and it is also recognized as close to being near-endangered.